Developing Canada's Infrastructure Report Card: Lessons Learned

Developing Canada's Infrastructure Report Card: Lessons Learned


CUI served as Project Manager for the 2016 Canadian Infrastructure Report Card. This included responsibility for managing the survey distribution to Canadian municipalities, organizing the results and convening 18 professional membership organizations to finalize the report card.
 
The rigorous data set created for the Report Card is a starting point to develop plans for achieving appropriate reinvestment in Canada’s infrastructure, improved asset management systems and better planning for the impact of a changing climate.
 
What is being invested in Canada’s urban infrastructure is far below the generally accepted rate required to sustain good repair. Investing in preventive maintenance and regular repair prolongs the service life of municipal infrastructure and helps prevent premature and costly reconstruction and service disruption.
 
All communities, including smaller municipalities, would benefit from increased asset management capacity. For example, computer-based information and maintenance-management systems should be used by municipalities to help create better and more consistent understanding and reporting of their infrastructure condition.
 
Very few municipalities use formal mechanisms to incorporate climate change adaptation strategies into decision-making. Given what we already know about the impact climate related events have on our municipal infrastructure, this is something that municipalities should be focusing on.

About the Canadian Infrastructure Report Card
The Canadian Infrastructure Report Card (CIRC) assesses the condition of Canada’s municipally-owned infrastructure to better inform decisions and solutions around Canada’s infrastructure. The CIRC was commissioned by the Canadian Construction Association, the Canadian Public Works Association, the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. The 2016 edition also received support from the Canadian Urban Transit Association and the Federal-Provincial/Territorial Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation Committee.